Author Topic: Dodging beaks  (Read 2581 times)

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Offline maxsmom

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Dodging beaks
« on: April 11, 2014, 12:58:31 PM »
Max took a quick and long bite of my ear this morning.  I quickly got him off my shoulder. He spent rest of morning trying to get back on my shoulder. He did a very remorseful routine and did a sneaky hop on my shoulder but I quickly got him off.


I know one is not supposed to allow birds on one's shoulder and this is not first bite while on my shoulder (last one may have been a year ago). So this is my fault

Meanwhile I dodge Charlie as he claims most of my living room as HIS area...for breeding I guess. He has lots of nice moments but gosh darn a lot of dodging of the beaks going on at my home
She flies with her own wings. Oregon State Motto

Offline Dartman

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Re: Dodging beaks
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2014, 04:06:37 PM »
Lurch will get frustrated and do similar, though usually not our ears luckily. He'll see us getting some food or drink, or just doing something interesting and fly over, then get upset we aren't sharing or scritchin or something and he sqwaks and bites or thumps with his beak etc.
Then we shake him off and tell him bad birds don't get treats and play time. He's learning it doesn't always get the result he wanted and sometimes he just sounds off and lundges without a real bite.
If we know he's pissy for sure we dodge his passes or put him off right away.
So many rules we must learn :shocking:
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Offline Julie T

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Re: Dodging beaks
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2014, 04:39:36 PM »
No fun maxsmom! You'll just have to be a brave woman a bit longer! I bet you're getting good at it too :icon_mrgreen: Just think, would you rather dodge beaks and deal with some pain and blood, or deal with problem life threatening egg laying?! You know I'm with you on that one  :)

Offline maxsmom

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Re: Dodging beaks
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2014, 11:06:55 PM »
Lurch will get frustrated and do similar, though usually not our ears luckily. He'll see us getting some food or drink, or just doing something interesting and fly over, then get upset we aren't sharing or scritchin or something and he sqwaks and bites or thumps with his beak etc.
Then we shake him off and tell him bad birds don't get treats and play time. He's learning it doesn't always get the result he wanted and sometimes he just sounds off and lundges without a real bite.
If we know he's pissy for sure we dodge his passes or put him off right away.
So many rules we must learn :shocking:

I have no idea for his reason. When I came home tonight he really wanted my shoulder but I simply couldn't.

Funny thing is I had been away for several days and returned 3 days ago. He was so happy I was home. He was repetitively saying for days....Mommy loves Maximus. I love you. Mommy . Max. .....in all combinations.....repetitively


Perhaps this is an outgrowth of being away a bit but I would expect acting to have occured when I got back.
 
She flies with her own wings. Oregon State Motto

Offline Dartman

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Re: Dodging beaks
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2014, 12:14:58 AM »
I bet it's similar to Lurch, he wants a treat, scratches, something, so he gets frustrated and lashes out. When he first started getting on my shoulder he'd just mostly sit happily and preen or ride around, then it changed and he got nippy
I've also noticed when he climbs up when I'm in my recliner many times he actually wants up to the top of the chair and if I don't help him up he nips, plus if he sees something scary outside.
When he first got here he would just immediately whip around and bite while getting scratches without any warning I could detect and now he mostly just accepts scratches and will sometimes get nippy but now he gives plenty of warning and sometimes I know he's just trying to play.
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Offline maxsmom

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Re: Dodging beaks
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2014, 04:40:09 AM »
It is going to take a while before I allow him back on my shoulder. I know he wants to be there as he is a bit velcro but I need to change our routine a bit. Too fast,  too out of no where , too painful.
She flies with her own wings. Oregon State Motto

Offline Dartman

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Re: Dodging beaks
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2014, 10:54:47 AM »
Yeah I agree, no shoulder till he calms down. It also  is probably hormones so he's acting out because of that too.
Lurch has been pretty hormonal lately as well and he's gotten nippy on sisters shoulder a few times lately.
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Offline Grontardo26044

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Re: Dodging beaks
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2014, 08:28:45 PM »
My 2 young parrots are still very playful. They are just 5 months old, not sure how long does it take for them to be fully developed.

Any suggestions, please?

Many thanks

Offline Dartman

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Re: Dodging beaks
« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2014, 08:46:27 PM »
I think they get more hormonal around 2 years old but every Maxi I've had was already past that age. They still would do the strut and get pissy at times but mostly are OK. Others can jump in with young bird experience on younger birds. Jan used to breed and raise them so I bet she'll jump in with good info.
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Offline momazon

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Re: Dodging beaks
« Reply #9 on: July 07, 2014, 12:22:42 PM »
At 18 months ours was acting like a grownup, but would still make his baby honking noise when scared.  About the age of 2 years, he began acting dominant, I suppose he thought. Now he is four and is kind of settling down, although he is prone to some antics you would not believe. 

He began mumbling and imitating household noised early on, and for some reason this week said two new words, "noodle", and "alright" very clearly. I am very certain he can talk a lot more than he does, but he is not terribly concerned with performing verbally!

Offline maxsmom

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Re: Dodging beaks
« Reply #10 on: July 07, 2014, 01:00:31 PM »
My white cap is 2. Honestly he has been bossy quite a while. Probably since he was 1. I do hope he settles down but believe I have several years to wait. He is worth it.
She flies with her own wings. Oregon State Motto

Offline Julie T

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Re: Dodging beaks
« Reply #11 on: July 08, 2014, 02:39:44 PM »
Raven is definitely not a baby anymore at 10 1/2 months old. Then again he's acted like an older man since he was way younger lol. He had I have become much better friends since our move, but can and will draw blood already at his age. Real hormonal behavior, I can't wait!!  :shocking: