Author Topic: Fluffing head Pionus body language  (Read 5982 times)

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Offline Dartman

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Re: Fluffing head Pionus body language
« Reply #15 on: September 21, 2014, 03:29:48 PM »
Lurch is like that with my sister, he likes her and loves to share toast and ride around on her shoulder when she's working in the kitchen, but she's not allowed to scritch him or really touch him other then handing over treats. Sometimes he gets tired of the treat, or the hands holding the treat and fluffs, or even screeches and strikes at the treat with her.
BUT she knows his moods and body language well enough now she just says fine, sets it down, and turns her back on him.
Luckily he decided I'm the one as that was the plan all along and his original owner was a old guy so I kinda resemble him, except for the really old part... :shocking:
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Offline Julie T

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UPDATE: Fluffing head Pionus body language
« Reply #16 on: December 19, 2014, 12:10:49 AM »
I posted this thread in September originally, asking about Raven's ambiguous head fluffing. Now that it's December, and I have seen MUCH more of this posture, and there is no doubt that he does not want to be touched when his head is fluffed in this particular way. He is much more aggressive now and prone to biting (or trying). It seems like he's like this 50% of the time! He's even getting territorial over his food which he wasn't previously. I know Pi's can be cage territorial too, and Raven is not, so I'm praying I'll at least have that stay that way. I'm not holding my breath though. I know he's a male Pionus (not unlike a small male Amazon) and I'm ready for it. It's just that it's a bummer sometimes. Sometimes I wish my female didn't die, or I got a female this time. But no, I really wanted a male, and I knew what I was getting into.. I just need some moral support here is all, from those who experience the same thing first hand. This and in the next year or two I know will be the hardest, since it's his first hormone surge  :(.

Also... He bites with NO warning body language!! At bed time. That is the time in particular when he can show no noticeable warning (feathers normal, looking relaxed) and still bite to draw blood. I suppose he's becoming defiant when it's time to go to bed. From this day on, I will use the stick to put him to bed. I type this with my bleeding finger.  >:(

Offline maxsmom

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Re: Fluffing head Pionus body language
« Reply #17 on: December 19, 2014, 04:46:49 AM »
It gets better. Hang in there. Nourish him regardless and he will appreciate it.

Give Raven time to mellow.....it takes years. I know I have many years ahead to wait for Max to mellow but I see improvements. Try a training exercise activity now. I do not train enough but I truly believe if you get their minds interested in training they are more positively engaged and less aggressive.

Yes, females sound cuddly but it is nice not to deal with eggs. Hang in there. I have not come out on other side completely but I see changes as Max approaches 3 in 3 months
She flies with her own wings. Oregon State Motto

Offline maxsmom

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Re: Fluffing head Pionus body language
« Reply #18 on: December 19, 2014, 04:50:07 AM »
Interestingly most  of regulars have males....you, me, Momazon, Cetan, Dartman, Eloy....so you have support
She flies with her own wings. Oregon State Motto

Offline momazon

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Re: Fluffing head Pionus body language
« Reply #19 on: December 19, 2014, 01:52:46 PM »
Yes, just like other species, males can be aggressive without a clear reason as we see it.  One useful thought I hold in my head is what Terry (Dartman) says, which is that pi's have their own rules that we don't understand. Dob needs to play with the dishtowel and chew holes in it every morning or I am in big trouble.  Likewise, he has to sit on my computer with music playing to get a decent head scritch, and he must be allowed to forage on the counter every morning and night. A little like living with a tiny dictator!  Like you, I love it, but we had agreed to  female and were told he was.  When we went to pick him up, the dna certificate showed he was a male.  Of course, we had been visiting him and feeding,  and my daughter was very attached.

The funny thing, is that my zon is clearly a male, and for 11 years we had been saying how very sweet "she" was.  Now that we know, every nip is attributed to Nasty Male Zon Syndrome.  Same bird, same moods. I wonder how much stereotyping I did on my human child, oops,  sorry sweetie!

I agree that training spends a lot of energy and they are nicer, but the head fluffing is hard to read.  Hang in there, the bond grows so much over the years.

Offline Dartman

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Re: Fluffing head Pionus body language
« Reply #20 on: December 19, 2014, 05:22:43 PM »
If it helps at all when Lurch first got here and was mad at the world he would bite quickly with no warning I could detect and I'd had Nerd for 31 years and could read him fine. He's probably getting hormonal and getting used to what's his and defending it. Lurch now will mostly give very clear warnings but I think where he was before he gave up because his clear to him back off signals were ignored so he went straight to a fast hard bite to protect himself.
Now that he knows we respect his warnings he gives them again and doesn't try to bite as hard or fast, plus he's learning a unwarranted bite ends all play time or treats.
He still gets pissy and pops the back of our necks when something isn't going like he wants but MOST times it's now noise and a light touch or peck.
There are still things that make him homicidal like certain hats, then all bets are off. When I see the crazy look in his eyes I check what hat and hoody I'm wearing and remove them if that's his trigger/issue.
Keep at it and eventually you two will reach a understanding. :shocking:
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Offline Julie T

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Re: Fluffing head Pionus body language
« Reply #21 on: December 19, 2014, 11:24:45 PM »
Thanks so much for the support everyone. It's good to know that you regulars have males too, so you can relate. I believe it does take years for them to mellow, but good news maxsmom that you already see little changes with Max at almost 3.

Robin my Red Bellied parrot who despite is much smaller, has a beak ALMOST as big as a Pi, and was downright vicious there at about 10 through most of his teens (I don't know why so late), but year round he was feisty, with hormone season being worse where he'd take chunks of flesh out of me. FINALLY it seems that in the past year or so (after turning 20 in July) he has mellowed out and is a really sweet and tolerant bird now. It also helps that we're bonded and he loves me (unlike Raven and I, although Raven is still so tolerant with his 'daddy')! This right now is Robin's hormone season, and knock on wood, he's pretty nice! His occasional hard bites are still nowhere near as vicious as when he was younger.
SO, I'm thinking we may have some years with Raven like what I went through with Robin, and then one day he'll mellow out some!

Truth is, I won't let Raven know through my body language, but I'm almost afraid of asking him to step up anymore. I'm now leery about how close my face is to him nowdays too. I guess there will be no more step up and a close hug and kiss before bedtime anymore since I will be using a stick now to put him to bed. He usually doesn't like to step up for me anyway, and now that he shows no detectable body language, I don't trust him. That's what I hate... Like the African Poi's, many times they show no detectable body language, or only a split second before the attack. I HOPE that Raven being a Pionus, he will EVENTUALLY stop just biting without body language like Lurch did. Maybe it's because he's still young and hasn't completely read the manual on "how to be a Pionus" yet!  :biglaughing: