Author Topic: Is a Christmas Tree a Foraging Toy?  (Read 1859 times)

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Offline momazon

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Is a Christmas Tree a Foraging Toy?
« on: November 06, 2016, 09:35:49 PM »
In an effort to decide what to do, I'd like others' input.  Do you have a tree and birds uncaged?  It has been many years since I had a tree, but think the zon will leave it alone if I have one again. We don't have a room where it can just be seen and not touched. 

Our dear Dobby was not the worst for destroying any tree, real or artificial, but he did a pretty good job of taking it down within minutes of being put up. There was a rescued greenwing who chewed everything to bits while it was still on the floor in boxes...not a good memory, but he did enjoy himself.

Now with one rather sedentary bird who is picky about her toys and doesn't move around much, I am thinking to give it another try, and would love to hear what you all do.

Offline Dartman

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Re: Is a Christmas Tree a Foraging Toy?
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2016, 11:41:06 PM »
Well Lurch loved to mess with the trees, Nerd did a little, but from what I've seen of Dobby lately he'd be all over a tree just to get us excited I think. he's given up on MOST of the laundry soap boxes and things now because we turned over one of those cloth shopping bags you buy and covered everything so he can't get at them now. He seems to alternate on what he loves to bother and hasn't eaten the plants for a few days, must have gotten bored with them.
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Offline momazon

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Re: Is a Christmas Tree a Foraging Toy?
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2016, 12:00:52 AM »
I never thought of turning a bag over things. What plants do you have? I used to have all the toxic ones, before we had birds.  I used to grow spider plants outside, bring them in,  and Dob would mow them down in a few seconds. The Christmas tree was a disaster his very first year  :yummy:

Offline Dartman

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Re: Is a Christmas Tree a Foraging Toy?
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2016, 12:16:09 AM »
We have ivy, dracinsea, jade, spider, poinsettias, cactus, northok pine. He's still quite alive after mowing down the ivy and will bite anything he can get at and will walk and climb all over anything to get to interesting stuff.
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Offline momazon

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Re: Is a Christmas Tree a Foraging Toy?
« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2016, 02:49:18 AM »
Well, that all sounds like nice salad fixings  :yummy:

Offline Dartman

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Re: Is a Christmas Tree a Foraging Toy?
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2016, 09:03:36 AM »
Yep, anything he can somewhat easily fly too is fair game but so far a few plants on the floor he hasn't touched so maybe that is a answer for now. We don't normally bother with a tree anymore, haven't for years so that one shouldn't be a problem anyways.
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Offline momazon

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Re: Is a Christmas Tree a Foraging Toy?
« Reply #6 on: November 19, 2016, 03:15:23 PM »
I feel better knowing that, since it did not cross my mind when we set this up. Kind of felt like a tree might be a big deal to others. For us, not so much.  We have had a candy dish, a quilted wall hanging, and a pumpkin as stand-ins for a tree in the past.

This summer I sprouted three avocados which are close to a foot tall, so I am thinking those will be our symbol of the holidays this year lol. Principessa does not eat plants or anything that is not in her dish, so I think I'll put some berries on them.  Lurch, JT and Eloy would like it, and they are on my mind this year, along with the BW who flew off in 2013 in a windstorm.  My new mind project is to see losses as making way for something new, and letting things go to their next adventure. Or whatever  :merrymoose:

Offline Dartman

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Re: Is a Christmas Tree a Foraging Toy?
« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2016, 03:42:18 PM »
Well that's a beautiful sentiment right there and a nice gesture. I certainly miss Lurch and am grateful for Dobby and I'm sure JT will aprove and we all miss Eloy too. I never met your Bronze Wing but I seem to remember she was very special to you.
Dobby right now is enjoying climbing and eating plants. He just bit a main stock off the Poinsettia as I was typing this and sounds like now he's trying to get into the left Halloween candy bag, little urchin.
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Offline momazon

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Re: Is a Christmas Tree a Foraging Toy?
« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2016, 09:27:23 PM »
He has a death wish. Aren't poinsettias some level of toxic? He gave me fits with the toothbrushes after I saw that x-ray of the cockatoo with over a dozen metal clips in the crop. Who ever knew the bristles are held in place by metal??

I am glad we love our birds, and keeping their memory is what just happens.

Offline Dartman

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Re: Is a Christmas Tree a Foraging Toy?
« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2016, 09:38:29 PM »
Supposedly, but read another study where they were given shredded Poinsettia and nobody died, but MAY have gotten a stomach ache. He was and is fine but I  moved it where he doesn't go for now as either way don't want a sick Dobby or a dead plant.
He certainly does seem to be attracted to anything really bad for him it seems but at least the bag over the laundry soap has stopped that little issue for now.
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Offline momazon

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Re: Is a Christmas Tree a Foraging Toy?
« Reply #10 on: November 22, 2016, 10:01:32 PM »
I am glad to hear he is getting his beak exercised, can't ever think of a time when he was not busy demolishing something. Sometimes he would hang upside down and beat his bell and toy into bits lol. Don't tell him, but I sprouted avocados and they are now looking  almost a foot tall. He would have eaten those with a bad result for sure.

The thing I can't figure is why the zon loves to chew her toys and is a good eater, but has never gone after human food or chewed things up.  Maybe her heart being small, and her spine curvature makes it too hard to get into trouble. The most she can manage is to fly from her perch to her boing once a day. She used to yell when Dob got an ink pen, Mom! Dob!", over and over till I came in, then she said "Out, out", when I put him back in his cage.  She really tattled on him.


Offline Dartman

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Re: Is a Christmas Tree a Foraging Toy?
« Reply #11 on: November 22, 2016, 10:18:17 PM »
I could sure use her, he really is a handful when your by yourself. He just keeps finding things to get into or chew up. He chewed all the wood wafers we setup for him to sawdust one day and now hardly touches the new ones I put up.
Lurch didn't like people food at first either when he got here and would even attack food he was offered, then start making tasting motions and next time he'd ask for some nicely. He was addicted to Taco Bell and we had some on the roof he was near and he went nuts but just wouldn't fly down.  :'(
Nerd and Lurch had favorite spots, so does Dobby but he also goes wherever anything intrigues him. He does love sitting on the TV warming his tootsies and we finally taped some dead pillow cases  back there to protect everything seeing how he's not going to stop doing it.
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Offline momazon

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Re: Is a Christmas Tree a Foraging Toy?
« Reply #12 on: November 22, 2016, 11:15:22 PM »
You guys think of things that I could not. Pillowcases are perfect. 

The thing about Dob is he is nicer than any other bird we have had. The zon rips fingers and hates anyone I hug or bring food to. Bad news for my daughter and mom  :shocking:  She also makes noise around four in the afternoon, calling the crows to come roost. Sounds nuts, but they do. Actually, I think they see her as a talking lunch box, but she calls them, even in the house. I have to come running if I am home, and pick her up. If I am not home, the neighbors complain. 

The BW was gorgeous but really nervous, and would bite my ear and latch on if she was on my shoulder in the kitchen and saw anything shiny.  You know, like everything in the kitchen.  One night she really attacked my neck and held onto the back of my ear. I could not help screaming, and she kept at it. I was in so much pain, I swung my head side to side and tried to brush her off with my hands. She held on and I ran down the hall to get a towel. There was blood everywhere and I still have  scars on the back of my ear and side of my neck. It was so bad I did not hold her or let her near me for weeks. She knew she had crossed the line and never bit again. Then she got out.

The sennie, I don't even want to discuss. She bit me every time I picked her up for four years.  Then she was intermittent for  a few months, then she went to a woman who was not me, and has not bitten since.

My daughter's caique was fantastic, but she hung upside down and bounced while beating up her toys, like Dob does. She was so wild that she pulled two toenails out just playing, and the vet recommended no hanging toys. Then she took to stalking my elderly mother, who would nearly collapse in laughter as she tried to get away from the little Godzilla. That bird was one of the funniest and best you could wish for, but she shrieked nonstop when my daughter was not near.

Dobby really is the best behaved towards people that we have had, and he is by far the quietest.  He does seem to be like a person who bites their fingernails and chews gum, though. He has to have something to chew.  I guess Eloy was similar, if memory serves.  My friends with females say they are much more quiet and do not chew. You said Lurch and Nerd were not this way, so I wonder what accounts for the difference.

Offline Dartman

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Re: Is a Christmas Tree a Foraging Toy?
« Reply #13 on: November 23, 2016, 12:01:00 AM »
I think it's just their individual personalities, like people. Lurch LOVED to gnaw the blankets we cover favorite spots with, almost like teething or chewing gum. Nerd LOVED to chew CERTAIN things, like the beloved jade plant he would sit on and chew till one day he chewed right through the branch he was sitting on. It's just that neither chewed on anything they could get at like Dobby seems to like to do. And yes he has to be the most well adjusted and mostly accepting and calm Maxi I have ever had, and he is mostly quiet with the occasional flock call or wolf whistle, and general happy whistling.
The other two were much easier to manage and watch because they weren't always looking for something to eat or destroy though occasionally either might get something that they had ignored before. My old mouse wheel had a Nerd bite, and he loved the gel pad of my mouse pad and it still has a hole in it from him. but they could also happily hang out and generally not bother anything around them that wasn't a favorite.
Nerd could have been a female as we never had him DNA'd but he also never laid a egg for 31 years and tended to do the Pionus strut and displays just like Dobby and Lurch did.
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Offline vampiric_conure

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Re: Is a Christmas Tree a Foraging Toy?
« Reply #14 on: November 25, 2016, 11:59:11 PM »
So far I've been lucky. August hasn't chewed anything. In fact it took him 2 and a half weeks to realize he could play with the toys in his foot toy bowl, the little booger :) The cockatiels, however, are ripe little monsters and will buzzsaw through anything they can get their beaks on :P
Beware of dog? No! Beware of cat! Wait, no. The Budgie is a killer, too.

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